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An innovative program to promote health promotion, quality of life, and wellness for School of Nursing faculty, staff, and students: Facilitators, barriers, and opportunities for broad system-level and cultural change

Published:October 29, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2020.10.018
      Members of the nursing profession are often challenged by attempts to engage in personal health and well-being practices because of their dedication, commitment, and passion for improving the lives of others through engagement in practice, research, service, and education. Research reveals disproportionately high rates of emotional distress and depression among nurses (
      • Letvak S.
      • Ruhm C.
      • McCoy T.
      Depression in hospital-employed nurses.
      ), coupled with challenges relative to work environment and culture as well as with prioritizing self-care. Distress and burnout among nurses are associated with compassion fatigue, poor sleep, trouble concentrating, limited performance in mental or interpersonal tasks, time management challenges, work-place bullying, lower productivity, chronic absenteeism, increased turnover, and compromised quality of care provision (
      • Drury V.
      • Craigie M.
      • Francis K.
      • Aoun S.
      • Hegney D.G.
      Compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, anxiety, depression and stress in registered nurses in Australia: Phase 2 results.
      ;
      • Ekici D.
      • Beder A.
      The effects of workplace bullying on physicians and nurses.
      ;
      • Kelly L.
      Burnout, compassion fatigue, and secondary trauma in nurses: Recognizing the occupational phenomenon and personal consequences of caregiving.
      ;
      • Roelen C.
      • van Rhenen W.
      • Schaufeli W.
      • van der Klink J.
      • Magerøy N.
      • Moen B.
      • Bjorvatn B.
      • Pallesen S.
      Mental and physical health-related functioning mediates between psychological job demands and sickness absence among nurses.
      ). Focusing on the well-being of nurses is a quality and safety imperative to improve the lives of nurses and for the people they serve. Accordingly, the authors of the Quadruple Aim posit that to promote optimal patient outcomes, cost-effective care, and patient satisfaction, we must also prioritize the well-being of providers (
      • Bodenheimer T.
      • Sinsky C.
      From triple to quadruple aim: Care of the patient requires care of the provider.
      ).
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