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Participation of inpatients in multidisciplinary team meetings: An explorative study of mental healthcare workers' perception

  • Kevin Berben
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Alexianen Zorggroep Tienen, Liefdestraat 10, 3300 Tienen, Belgium.
    Affiliations
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

    Alexianen Psychiatric Hospital Tienen, Alexianen Care Group, Tienen, Belgium

    PXL University College, Department of Healthcare, Hasselt, Belgium
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  • Eva Dierckx
    Affiliations
    Alexianen Psychiatric Hospital Tienen, Alexianen Care Group, Tienen, Belgium

    Free University of Brussels, Faculty of Psychology, Brussels, Belgium
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  • Ann Van Hecke
    Affiliations
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

    Nursing Department, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium
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  • Sofie Verhaeghe
    Affiliations
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

    Department of Nursing, VIVES University College, Roeselare, Belgium

    Hasselt University, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Hasselt, Belgium
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Published:August 05, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2022.07.030

      Highlights

      • There is a great willingness among mental healthcare workers to involve inpatients in multidisciplinary team meetings.
      • Eight out of ten mental healthcare workers feel capable to involve inpatients in multidisciplinary team meetings.
      • Nurses, pedagogues, and social workers feel less competent and are therefore less willing to involve inpatients in multidisciplinary team meetings.
      • Experienced and trained mental healthcare workers in patient participation tend to give more autonomy to the patient when participating in a multidisciplinary team meeting.

      Abstract

      Aim

      To explore the perception of mental healthcare workers about participation of inpatients during multidisciplinary team meetings (MTMs) and to determine which demographic and contextual factors are associated with this perception.

      Methods

      A cross-sectional multicentre study in 17 psychiatric hospitals with 701 mental healthcare workers was performed between 29 April and 19 May 2019. For measuring the perception of the mental healthcare workers, the Patient Participation during Multidisciplinary Team meetings Questionnaire was used.

      Results

      93 % of the mental healthcare workers indicate that they are willing to allow patients to participate in a MTM. Most mental healthcare workers prefer an active role for the patient when participating in a MTM (93 %) and a collaborative role for the patient when making decisions in a MTM (75 %). Level of education, discipline, experience with patient participation in MTMs, working in a team where patient participation is applied, and recent training on patient participation, are associated with the mental healthcare worker's perception on patient participation in MTMs.

      Conclusion

      Mental healthcare workers report a great willingness to involve inpatients in MTMs. However, social workers, nurses, and pedagogues feel less competent and are less positive about the effects of patient participation in MTMs. Mental healthcare workers with recent training in patient participation and experience in patient participation in MTMs feel more competent and believe more often that the patient should fulfil a more autonomous role when participating in a MTM. These results can be used to understand and improve patient participation in MTMs in mental healthcare.

      Keywords

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